Joe Ori

Don’t believe the hype. Entrepreneurs come in all shapes, sizes and ages — not just young and hip.

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Joe Ori

Originally published at https://www.get5.io/blog/age-excuse-start-business

The narrative in popular media is clear. With a few high profile exceptions, successful entrepreneurs are portrayed as young and hip. I could go further and say white and male, but that’s another article, so we’ll stick with young and hip.

It’s all hoodies and jeans, and skateboarding to “the office,” also known as a friend’s parents’ garage or guesthouse.

It’s just not true. I’m going to dust off a well-seasoned cliché and say that age really is…


If you can’t create a workable business plan and execute on it, even the best, most innovative ideas aren’t worth much.

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Joe Ori

I have had so many people come to me with truly great ideas. I mean, market disruptors, things that people would gravitate to right now with open arms. But they end up dead in the water, so to speak, because I don’t have time to mold the clay, to be “the guy.” You know, the one who writes the business plan and does all that it takes to move that idea from a thought bubble over your head, to a finished product in your hand.

To be a successful entrepreneur you’ve got to be a do-er! Think about it. If…


You can talk your way into an opportunity, just be prepared to back it up.

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A long time ago I read that Kevin Plank, founder of Under Armour, carried a stack of different business cards in his pocket when he was first starting out. He was the president, vice president, director of operations, R&D, he went into every meeting pretending to be someone else to make Under Armour look like more than what it really was, an idea. …


With focused attention, Michigan’s cannabis market can easily and quickly reach its full potential, and overcome the barriers hindering its growth.

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Before I helped to found Six Labs, a Michigan-based cannabis company, I did a lot — I mean a lot — of research. I visited dispensaries all over the country. Those in northern and southern California vs those in Michigan and neighboring states like Illinois — well, let’s just say it was like the difference between going to your local convenience store to buy wine and going to a specialty store like Binny’s.

It’s the difference between the makeup counter at Walgreens and walking into Sephora. The former might provide what you need, but the overall experience and the endless…


Consumers deserve the highest safety and testing standards for cannabis across the board.

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Joe Ori (left) at Six Labs

For those who are new to the cannabis industry, things might be confusing initially. For instance, is there a difference between medical and recreational cannabis? The answer is, yes and no. There are some distinct differences in use, affect, cost and in the standards related to cultivation, labeling, etc., but there is also some crossover when it comes to usefulness and application from a health and wellness perspective.

I think, however, it’s important to establish one thing. While there are some differences between medical and recreational cannabis…


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Photography by Six Labs

It may not be the perfect comparison, but there are some striking similarities between the end of alcohol prohibition and the slow crawl to cannabis legalization nationally. Both industries were stymied by state legislatures that were hesitant to respond to changing circumstances, and both faced a similar challenge: how to sell to a new generation of consumers?

Legalizing cannabis was supposed to create a well-organized marketplace where consumers could easily buy products that they knew were safe and high-quality, and states could collect new tax revenues to fund their governments. However, the illegal market for cannabis continues to thrive, which…


The COVID-19 pandemic has presented the cannabis industry with a huge opportunity — if companies can adapt quickly to marketplace shifts and consumer demands.

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Photography by Six Labs

Recently I shared my perspective on what the coronavirus could mean for our industry, how the cannabis industry would fare during the pandemic, and how public attitudes might shift in response to the outbreak.

Obviously having state governments recognize cannabis as an essential business is proof that we’ve built an industry that’s recognized as a medical necessity. It’s a seismic shift in attitude and perception from 5–10 years ago. Fortunately, state leaders understand that cannabis is first and foremost medicine, and it plays a critical role in a patient’s health and well-being.

Now it’s important that we absorb this seismic…


The coronavirus completely changed the entire Cannabis industry almost overnight.

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Photography by Six Labs

I don’t think it could be more clear — cannabis has officially arrived at the forefront of mainstream society in America.

Never before in my life have I seen the perception of an entire industry completely change so quickly for the better. We’re not accepted by everyone, but it’s telling that “two-thirds of Americans say the use of marijuana should be legal,” according to a 2019 survey from the Pew Research Center. Further, the number of American adults who oppose legalization has fallen from 52% in 2010 to 32% in 2019. …


Cannabis sales are booming amid the COVID-19 outbreak.

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Hand sanitizer. Toilet paper. Cannabis. What do they have in common?

From a consumer standpoint, we can’t get enough of them. Right now they’re all flying off store shelves as everyone tries to prepare to shelter in place and self-isolate as we face the very real threat of the coronavirus pandemic.

As cannabis users stock up for potential quarantines, or simply light up to find relief and calm anxiety during these extremely trying times, dispensaries are doing booming business. To put that in perspective: Mid-March cannabis sales blew past average numbers for 4/20, the unofficial cannabis holiday, by 50%.

Sales…


Being an early late-adopter has major advantages

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In my latest piece, I issued a call for more research and testing within the cannabis industry.

For a variety of reasons explored more densely in said piece, it’s imperative that we discover the amounts of elements like arsenic, mercury, and lead that can be found in cannabis without it affecting the human body.

Cannabis testing and labeling requirements vary dramatically from state to state. Although most states do require testing for the potency of these various contaminants (residual solvents, microbes, pesticides and heavy metals), the minimum thresholds can vary substantially or not be tested at all. …

Joe Ori

Trial Lawyer, Cannabis Advocate, Entrepreneur. Father of four. Doing “the right thing,” my way. 😎

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